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TOP FISHING GUIDES IN GEORGIA

TOP GEORGIA FISHING TRIPS

Fishing in Georgia

Yup, this state is known for a little of everything. So stop by a peach stand on your way Augusta National Golf Club and then toss some pecans in your fishing tackle and head out to one of our top fishing destinations in Florida.
  • Best Fishing in Georgia

    Lake Lanier

    • This 37,000-acre reservoir is also sometimes referred to as "Lake Sidney Lanier," located near Atlanta, Georgia, and boasts some fantastic Striped Bass fishing. With near 700 miles of shoreline, bank fishing spots are available. However, booking a GA fishing charter is the best method if you don't have your own boat.
    • Your best fishing spots will depend on which fish species you're wanting to cast for. Largemouth Bass, Striped Bass, Crappie, Brook Trout, Rainbow Trout, Brown Trout, Walleye, Channel Catfish, and Panfish are all available for a memorable fishing trip.
    • Lake Lanier is a massive lake, and it can be challenging to find the best spots for fishing, so we recommend booking one of the many affordable fishing guides on the lake. If that's not your style, then during the colder months of the year, try fishing near West Bank Park and target deep water structure areas for Largemouth Bass. During the warmer months, try the shallow-water right when the sun comes up, Little River Park is an excellent location to place your bets.

    Lake Allatoona

    • The United States Army Corps of Engineers Reservoir has 11,860 acres of water and is located 30 miles from Atlanta. The lake was formed by the Etowah River.
    • Spotted Bass anglers will enjoy the dominating high numbers of fish in this lake. The version of these fish is of the Alabama fish variety and therefore tends to grow a little bit larger than what anglers find on Kentucky Lake. With this fish-loving the deep water, you can typically find people taking advantage of the spawn during April and May and casting for Spotted Bass in the shallows.
    • The Georgia state fish is the next best thing on this lake, and the Etowah River, Allatoona Creek, and the Little River are great destinations to start. A lot of work has been done to improve the Largemouth Bass fishing, and around 1,000 trees have been cut down on the shorelines to create a better habitat.

    Carters Lake

    • The Georgia mountains are just south of the state's most bottomless reservoir at over 450-feet in some places. This body of water is fed by the Coosawattee River, and when touring the lake on a boat, you will notice a lack of private homes or private docks on its shorelines, helping it to be one of the most scenic lakes in the state. Besides beauty, Cartes Lake is also a treasured freshwater fishing location for its access to Walleye fishing.
    • For fishing on Carters Lake, you will be happy to know that the Largemouth Bass record is a rod bending 13 pounds and 1 ounce.

    Lake Seminole

    • Lake Seminole is located where the Flint River and Chattahoochee Rivers come together to amass over 37,500-acres of fishing paradise.
    • Fishing for Channel Catfish has some good results with most common catches weighing at around 3 pounds, and one or two catches of the day can result in some 10-plus pound fish. For the more giant catfish, try fishing with cut bait in some deep pockets of the lake. Smaller catfish will flock towards to shallows during nighttime.

    Golden Isles

    • A world-class saltwater fishing destination for deep-sea fishing. Enjoy fishing for Tarpon and Snapper, fish in the surf for some big Redfish, or try fly fishing the tidal rivers near St. Simon for some Speckled Sea Trout or Spanish Mackerel.

    Flint River

    • Some of the best fishing in Georgia is located on the upper portions of the Flint River. Flowing into Lake Seminole, the river can be flat and calm or become treacherous in an instant, so its essential anglers stay up to date on the water levels and weather conditions.
    • The sunfish or shoal bass is a big reason why this fishing is phenomenal. You and your fishing charter should target the areas between the Gay and Thomaston for the areas to catch these "Flint River Smallmouths."

    Other Fishing Spots

    • Lake Hartwell, Clark Hills Lake, and Lake Oconee
  • Licenses and Regulations

    The rules and requirements for a Georgia fishing license are pretty straightforward. However, you should always stay up to date and validate all details through the Georgia Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Resources Division.

    For residents of Georgia, you can purchase a fishing license for $15. Acquiring a free saltwater permit is required for Saltwater fishing. Additionally, if you're fishing for Trout, then you will need a separate Trout license. An Annual Trout License will cost $10, or a one-day license can be purchased for $5.

    Non-residents of "The Peach State" have options of purchasing an annual fishing license for $50, or a One-day license can be bought for $10. Additional days can be added at $3.50 per extra day. Saltwater permits are also required for non-residents, and just like for residents, they are free. Trout fishing for non-residents will require obtaining an annual trout license for $25 or one-day for $10.

    To purchase a license, you can swing by one of the many outdoor sporting good stores in the state, or you may buy one online.

Fishing Calendar for the Best Times to Fish in Georgia

Januarywinter

Where: Lake Lanier

Species: Smallmouth Bass

Februarywinter

Where: Lake Allatoona

Species: Largemouth Bass

Marchspring

Where: Carters Lake

Species: Walleye

Aprilspring

Where: Lake Lanier

Species: Walleye

Mayspring

Where: Rabun

Species: Walleye

Junesummer

Where: Sunfish

Species: Flint River

Julysummer

Where: Lake Seminole

Species: Channel Catfish

Augustsummer

Where: Grand Isles

Species: Tarpon

Septemberfall

Where: Flint River

Species: Shoal Bass

Octoberfall

Where: Flint River

Species: Shoal Bass

Novemberfall

Where: Carters Lake

Species: Walleye

Decemberwinter

Where: Clarks Hill

Species: Crappie

FAQ’s ABOUT FISHING IN GEORGIA

Where can I go fishing in Georgia?

For saltwater, the SAV Artificial Reef is a destination hotspot. Fish for Snappers, Groupers, Barracuda, and other reef fish among the wreckage of old ships, tanks, and surplus steel. For Freshwater fishing near Atlanta fish, the upper Chattahoochee for trout and stocked fish, for a more excluded experience, try the Nottely River.

Do you need a fishing license for catch and release in Georgia?

Where is the best trout fishing in Georgia?

How much is a trout stamp in GA?

What is the cleanest Lake In Georgia?

Where is the best bass fishing in Georgia?